Philip Emeagwali Internet | Famous Inventors and their Inventions | Black History Month 2020

Philip Emeagwali Internet | Famous Inventors and their Inventions | Black History Month 2020


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [Philip Emeagwali Internet] An “internet”
is a global network of processors that encircles a globe.
That internet might occupy the space of
a soccer field or might encircle the Earth itself.
That internet might be a supercomputer de facto
or might be the Internet itself per se. The technology defines the name,
not the name defines the technology. For my discovery
of practical parallel supercomputing that occurred on the Fourth of July 1989
that subsequently made the news headlines,
I defined my globe the way mathematicians prefer, namely, as
a sixteen-dimensional hypersphere within a sixteen-dimensional hyperspace.
I visualized the two-raised-to-power sixteen,
or 64 binary thousand, processors that I programmed and used to solve
grand challenge problems as being equal distances apart
and distributed across the fifteen-dimensional hypersurface
of that hypersphere. In contrast to my neatly organized
and interconnected processors, the computers
that outline the Internet that encircled the Earth
were added organically and incrementally
and are non-identical to each other and non-equidistant from each other.
And as a result of those irregularities and non-uniformities,
the email communications between the computers on the Internet
must be asynchronously sent and received
and for that reason, the Internet itself cannot be harnessed
and used to solve the grand challenge initial-boundary value problems
that is a recurring decimal in extreme-scale mathematics
and computational physics. The email messaging within my supercomputer
is processor-to-processor emailing, not your everyday
person-to-computer-to-computer-to-person emailing. I discovered
practical parallel supercomputing when I figured out
how to automatically program across my new internet
and how to communicate synchronously while computing simultaneously
and doing both as the precondition for recording the fastest computation
that can arise from within the fastest computer in the world. That [quote unquote] “fastest computer”
is not a computer per se. I discovered that the fastest computer
is a virtual supercomputer that is an internet de facto. I was in the news headlines because
I figured out how to harness the slowest processors in the world
and harness them around a new internet and do so to record speeds
in supercomputing that were previously unrecorded.
I invented the world’s fastest computer
that computes across a new internet that is a new global network of
two-raised-to-power sixteen, or 65,536, commodity-off-the-shelf processors
that were equal distances apart from each other
and that were identical to each other
and that were tightly-coupled to each other
and that tightly-encircled a globe
that is shaped like a sixteen-dimensional hypersphere
in sixteen-dimensional hyperspace. I also envisioned
my new global network of 64 binary thousand processors
as married together as one cohesive supercomputing machinery
and married together by sixteen times two-raised-to-power sixteen,
or 1,048,576, bi-directional email wires that were uniform and regular
and that were etched onto the fifteen-dimensional surface
of that globe that was shaped like a
sixteen-dimensional hypersphere in hyperspace.
In the modern configuration of supercomputers
and at one foot per email wire, those email wires
will total 200 miles of cables. This never-before-seen internet
is called the Philip Emeagwali Internet. My Eureka Moment—of 8:15
in the morning of the Fourth of July 1989—made the news headlines
around the globe in 1989 and did so because
I was the first person to discover how to compute simultaneously
and around a globe, or how to compute around
a new internet that is a new global network of
tightly-coupled processors that shared nothing between each other.
That is, I de facto invented the world’s fastest computer
and I invented it by discovering how and why
parallel processing is the vital technology
that will make every supercomputer super. My world’s fastest computation occurred
after I discovered how to communicate synchronously
and do so around a new global network of powers-of-two processors
that is called the Philip Emeagwali Internet. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

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